Difference between revisions of "Waterproofing Techniques"

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[[category:guides]]
 
[[category:guides]]
We have all had the problem of opening a cache and finding a mass of wet leaves and mud inside. Here are some ways you can help this problem:
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== Waterproofing Containers ==
  
*Check the seals on containers before placing them. If in doubt, fill up the kitchen sink, weigh down the container, and put some toilet paper or tissue in. Put the container in the sink, and wait a few hours. When you open it, there should be no water inside. If there is, here are some things you can do:
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At some point, most geocachers have opened a cache and found a mass of wet paper, leaves, and mud inside. Here are some ways to make sure your own cache doesn't become one of these waterlogged messes.
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** Buy a new container.
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* Check the seals on containers before placing them. Here are a couple ways to do this:
**Get some silicone caulk, and spread a thin layer around the edge of the lid.
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** Fill up a sink or bathtub, close the container with some tissue paper inside it, and weigh down the container so it is fully submerged. After a few hours, retrieve and open the container. There should be no water inside.
** Get some teflon tape and wrap it around the threads (of a pill bottle, for example). This comes in rolls, about 99 cents each. 3 wraps should keep your cache dry.
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** Place the container outside with some tissue paper inside it. Choose a location that exposes it to rain/sprinklers at least as much as the cache's intended location. After a few weeks, open the container. There should be no water inside.
**If it's an ammo can, check the gasket (on the inside of the lid, all around) before you buy it
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* Use [[Cache Containers#Good cache containers|good containers]]. Cheap containers (e.g., semi-disposable storage containers) tend to leak more.
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* Spread a thin layer of silicone caulk around the edge of the lid.
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* Wrap some teflon tape around the threads of containers with screw-on lids (for example, pill bottles). Teflon tape comes in rolls, about a dollar each. Three wraps should keep your cache dry.
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* Check the gasket of an [[ammo can]] (on the inside of the lid, all around) before you buy it.
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== Waterproofing Documents ==
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* Labels, [[Stash Note|stash notes]], and other documents can be laminated. If you don't have a laminating machine, most copy shops will laminate documents for a modest charge.
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* Various waterproofing/sealing products (e.g., Mod Podge) can help seal decals or labels that you have printed on a home computer. You can find them in most craft stores.
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* [[Log book#Waterproof paper|Waterproof paper]] can be used to print stash notes, log sheets, and other documents.
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* [[Stash Note|Stash notes]] and [[Log book|logs]] can be placed in a ziplock bag inside the container. However, ziplock bags eventually leak (especially if pens/pencils are placed inside them too), and then they just trap moisture and hasten the deterioration of the documents.

Latest revision as of 07:50, 15 January 2010

[edit] Waterproofing Containers

At some point, most geocachers have opened a cache and found a mass of wet paper, leaves, and mud inside. Here are some ways to make sure your own cache doesn't become one of these waterlogged messes.

  • Check the seals on containers before placing them. Here are a couple ways to do this:
    • Fill up a sink or bathtub, close the container with some tissue paper inside it, and weigh down the container so it is fully submerged. After a few hours, retrieve and open the container. There should be no water inside.
    • Place the container outside with some tissue paper inside it. Choose a location that exposes it to rain/sprinklers at least as much as the cache's intended location. After a few weeks, open the container. There should be no water inside.
  • Use good containers. Cheap containers (e.g., semi-disposable storage containers) tend to leak more.
  • Spread a thin layer of silicone caulk around the edge of the lid.
  • Wrap some teflon tape around the threads of containers with screw-on lids (for example, pill bottles). Teflon tape comes in rolls, about a dollar each. Three wraps should keep your cache dry.
  • Check the gasket of an ammo can (on the inside of the lid, all around) before you buy it.

[edit] Waterproofing Documents

  • Labels, stash notes, and other documents can be laminated. If you don't have a laminating machine, most copy shops will laminate documents for a modest charge.
  • Various waterproofing/sealing products (e.g., Mod Podge) can help seal decals or labels that you have printed on a home computer. You can find them in most craft stores.
  • Waterproof paper can be used to print stash notes, log sheets, and other documents.
  • Stash notes and logs can be placed in a ziplock bag inside the container. However, ziplock bags eventually leak (especially if pens/pencils are placed inside them too), and then they just trap moisture and hasten the deterioration of the documents.
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