Difference between revisions of "Virtual cache"

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A '''Virtual Cache''' is a cache that exists in a form of a location. The reward for these caches is the location itself and sharing information about the visit.
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[[Category: Terms]]
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A '''virtual cache''' exists only as a location; there is no physical [[Cache container|container]] or [[log book]]. The reward for these caches is the location itself and sharing information about the visit.
  
Virtual caches were introduced into the geocaching.com site as a countermeasure to physical caches being [[Harmful_logs#Geocaching_Restrictions|banned in places such as National Parks]]. Since no container is required, a virtual cache could essentially be placed anywhere, especially in places where a real container would not be possible or advisable.
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[http://www.geocaching.com/ Geocaching.com] introduced virtual caches in response to [[Harmful_logs#Geocaching_Restrictions|physical caches being banned]] in places such as National Parks. Since no container is required, a virtual cache can be located in places where hiding a container is impossible or impractical.
  
Because of the nature of these geocaches, the cache vistor is often required to take a picture or answer a question about the location before they can post. For example, a historical site might require the finder to locate a plaque at the location of the coordinates and find a piece of information on it which would not be possible to find out unless the site was actually visited. That information would be emailed to the cache owner before claiming the cache as a find. A photo requirement usually involves either having a picture of yourself taken in front of a specific object at the cache site, or placing your [[Glossary#G|GPSr]] next to an object and taking a picture. This is done to verify that you actually were at the site and are not using an old vacation picture or a photo that was found on the internet.
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Visitors to virtual caches are often required to prove that they found the location by posting photographs taken at the location, or by answering questions about the location. For example, a historical site might require the finder to locate a plaque at the posted coordinates and send email to the cache owner with a piece of obscure information found on the plaque. Photo requirements usually specify that you and/or your [[GPSr]] must be in the photo taken at the cache location. This assures that you actually were at the site and are not using an old vacation picture or a photo found on the internet.
  
Although many locations are interesting, a virtual cache should be out of the ordinary enough to warrant logging a visit. A common guideline was that a loction should be something "worthy of inclusion in a coffee table book."  
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Although many locations are interesting, a virtual cache should be sufficiently out of the ordinary to warrant logging a visit. A common guideline was that a loction should be something "worthy of inclusion in a coffee table book."
  
Virtual Caches are now considered [[waymark]]s on [http://waymarking.com/ Waymarking.com], though older Virtuals that were created before the posting of the official waymarking website have been grandfathered into the geocaching website.  
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In 2005, Geocaching.com stopped registering new virtual caches (including [[EarthCache]]s), although existing virtual caches were grandfathered. New virtual caches had to be registered as [[waymark]]s at [http://waymarking.com/ Waymarking.com]. However, in 2006, Geocaching.com started registering new EarthCaches again (but no other new virtual caches).
  
For finding a Virtual, a [[geocacher]] is able to log and receive a Virtual Cache [[icon]].  
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[[Geocacher]]s who log a find for a virtual cache receive a virtual cache [[icon]].
 
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[[Category: Terms]]
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Latest revision as of 23:57, 24 January 2007

A virtual cache exists only as a location; there is no physical container or log book. The reward for these caches is the location itself and sharing information about the visit.

Geocaching.com introduced virtual caches in response to physical caches being banned in places such as National Parks. Since no container is required, a virtual cache can be located in places where hiding a container is impossible or impractical.

Visitors to virtual caches are often required to prove that they found the location by posting photographs taken at the location, or by answering questions about the location. For example, a historical site might require the finder to locate a plaque at the posted coordinates and send email to the cache owner with a piece of obscure information found on the plaque. Photo requirements usually specify that you and/or your GPSr must be in the photo taken at the cache location. This assures that you actually were at the site and are not using an old vacation picture or a photo found on the internet.

Although many locations are interesting, a virtual cache should be sufficiently out of the ordinary to warrant logging a visit. A common guideline was that a loction should be something "worthy of inclusion in a coffee table book."

In 2005, Geocaching.com stopped registering new virtual caches (including EarthCaches), although existing virtual caches were grandfathered. New virtual caches had to be registered as waymarks at Waymarking.com. However, in 2006, Geocaching.com started registering new EarthCaches again (but no other new virtual caches).

Geocachers who log a find for a virtual cache receive a virtual cache icon.

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