Difference between revisions of "Dave Ulmer"

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The 58 year old retired computer engineer doesn’t cache much anymore, and often does not log the caches he does hunt.  In a phone interview with this author, for an [http://www.todayscacher.com/2004/may/people.html article in Today’s Cacher], Ulmer said, “I only log the really good ones.”
 
The 58 year old retired computer engineer doesn’t cache much anymore, and often does not log the caches he does hunt.  In a phone interview with this author, for an [http://www.todayscacher.com/2004/may/people.html article in Today’s Cacher], Ulmer said, “I only log the really good ones.”
  
Spending most of his time traveling in a motor home with a dirt bike and a snowmobile, Ulmer uses geocaching today simply as a tool for navigating from one “sweet spot” to another. He really fancies virtual caches.
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Spending most of his time traveling in a motor home with a dirt bike and a snowmobile, Ulmer uses geocaching today simply as a tool for navigating from one “sweet spot” to another. He really fancies [[Virtual Cache|virtual caches]].
  
 
According to a childhood friend, in a  [http://www.todayscacher.com/2004/jun/letters.html letter] to Today’s Cacher,  
 
According to a childhood friend, in a  [http://www.todayscacher.com/2004/jun/letters.html letter] to Today’s Cacher,  

Revision as of 23:36, 11 October 2006

Commonly referred to as “the father of geocaching,” Dave Ulmer hid the first geostash on May 3, 2000; on the same day he predicted: “soon we will have thousands of stashes all over the world to go searching for.”

The 58 year old retired computer engineer doesn’t cache much anymore, and often does not log the caches he does hunt. In a phone interview with this author, for an article in Today’s Cacher, Ulmer said, “I only log the really good ones.”

Spending most of his time traveling in a motor home with a dirt bike and a snowmobile, Ulmer uses geocaching today simply as a tool for navigating from one “sweet spot” to another. He really fancies virtual caches.

According to a childhood friend, in a letter to Today’s Cacher, Ulmer grew up in Jacksonville, Florida, and was anything but an ordinary kid. In grade school, his mechanical mind produced transistor radios built into band aid boxes, super fast mini-bikes, and (presumably later) a still made from a water heater.

He is the author of the forward in The Geocaching Handbook (Falcon Guide), by Layne Cameron.

Ulmer was the guest of honor on a 7-day Alaskan geocaching cruise in September, 2005.

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