Difference between revisions of "Bluetooth"

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[[Category:GPS brands]]
 
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Bluetooth GPS recievers are not so much a brand of GPS recievers but more of a class.  They come from many different manufacturers, but they all have the ability to communicate with other devices wirelessly using bluetooth technology.  Usually a bluetooth gpsr simply sends a stream of coordinates across it's bluetooth link to the listening device.  The listening device could be a PC, a PDA or a laptop.  Bluetooth gpsr's usually do not have a screen, or memory, and only an on/off switch.  The benefit of this is usually a great deal on a powerful GPS chipset.  If you cache paperless with a bluetooth-enabled PDA, or laptop, this could be a great option for you.
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Bluetooth GPS receivers are not so much a brand of GPS receivers but more of a class.  They come from many different manufacturers, but they all have the ability to communicate with other devices wirelessly using bluetooth technology.  Usually a bluetooth gpsr simply sends a stream of coordinates across it's bluetooth link to the listening device.  The listening device could be a PC, a PDA or a laptop.  Bluetooth gpsr's usually do not have a screen, or memory, and only an on/off switch.  The benefit of this is usually a great deal on a powerful GPS chipset.  If you cache paperless with a bluetooth-enabled PDA, or laptop, this could be a great option for you.
Basically, you would perform any mapping, navigation or plotting functions on the other device, with your GPS being used simply as a source for your current coordinates
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Basically, you would perform any mapping, navigation or plotting functions on the other device, with your GPS being used simply as a source for your current coordinates.

Latest revision as of 02:07, 27 February 2006


Bluetooth GPS receivers are not so much a brand of GPS receivers but more of a class. They come from many different manufacturers, but they all have the ability to communicate with other devices wirelessly using bluetooth technology. Usually a bluetooth gpsr simply sends a stream of coordinates across it's bluetooth link to the listening device. The listening device could be a PC, a PDA or a laptop. Bluetooth gpsr's usually do not have a screen, or memory, and only an on/off switch. The benefit of this is usually a great deal on a powerful GPS chipset. If you cache paperless with a bluetooth-enabled PDA, or laptop, this could be a great option for you. Basically, you would perform any mapping, navigation or plotting functions on the other device, with your GPS being used simply as a source for your current coordinates.

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